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Re: Job Opportunity

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I liked your reply.  Good one.

>>> Christopher Wright <chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com> 8/23/2007 10:35 AM >>>

On Aug 23, 2007, at 1:38 AM, Mark Gilligan wrote:

> You can learn what you need to learn by reading a few
> law books and reading the literature provided by your
> E&O insurance carrier.  Your insurance agent can also
> be a good resource to help you review contracts.

Sounds like the perfect advice for the lawyer who wants to do his own 
engineering.

I asked my accountant once whether a small practice like mine 
actually needed an accountant. He told me it was up to me, but that 
he felt that when someone needs engineering he should find an 
engineer. I've never regretted retaining a real accountant, and if I 
ever have legal issues I'll find a lawyer, not an insurance agent.

Christopher Wright P.E. |"They couldn't hit an elephant at
chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com   | this distance" (last words of Gen.
.......................................| John Sedgwick, Spotsylvania 
1864)
http://www.skypoint.com/~chrisw/



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