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Re: Expansive Foundation

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You should use the parameters given from soil report, and in accordance to PTI's design guide. There was no direction given for "reduced" forces pertaining to your case.
 
thks,
Milo
 
----- Original Message ----
From: Gautam Manandhar <Gautam_Manandhar(--nospam--at)ci.richmond.ca.us>
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2007 12:11:56 PM
Subject: RE: Expansive Foundation

Adjebli, Chuck, & Milo :

 

Thank you for your response.

 

Milo:

 

You indicated you used PT Slab.  I felt that 1500 psf uplift was high – just curious what uplift forces did you design your PT slabs for.

 

Gautam

 


From: rowyz(--nospam--at)sbcglobal.net [mailto:rowyz(--nospam--at)sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 7:40 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Expansive Foundation

 

At a residential project I've used a PT slab on grade; design guides and handbooks are available at PTI.

 

Milo Z, PE  

----- Original Message ----
From: Gautam Manandhar <Gautam_Manandhar(--nospam--at)ci.richmond.ca.us>
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 3:13:53 PM
Subject: Expansive Foundation

 

List members

 

I am working on a site that has expansive soil.   The soil report indicates the uplift force from the expansive soil to be 1500 psf.  The foundation consists of piers and grade beams.  I understand there is a compressible material that can be installed between the soil and the underside of the grade beam to reduce the overall uplift load.  Can anyone point me to web site regarding this material or provide specs on this material.

 

Gautam

 

 


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