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RE: More "plan check" stuff ...

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I believe the "design" stipulation that some people put on their plans
is directed towards prefabricated components that require engineering
themselves, such as trusses or sunshades -- not to instruct the
contractor to review a design.  I would agree that the "best practice is
to clearly tell the contractor what you expect him to do", but I can't
purchase a copy of the code to staple to all of my drawings.  The
"contract documents" must be put together to indicate compliance with
whatever building code applies to that project, whether the state's
adopted code or another code acceptable to the building official,
regardless of whether there is an architect or engineer on the project.

Yes, the IBC & CBC have several sections that state information to be
placed on the drawings ... Is that all?  What about exit illumination
intensity?  What about the maximum pushing force to get a door open?
What about required signage?  I understand that a lot of this
information goes into the specifications, but how much?  Is it
necessary?  A lot of the notes that we put on the drawings are in
response to issues that have come up in the past that we want to
particularly "highlight" so they don't get missed again ... But how much
is truly necessary?

I'm not sure there is a really good answer.




-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Gilligan [mailto:m_k_gilligan(--nospam--at)yahoo.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2008 11:41 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: More "plan check" stuff ...


The 2006 IBC has sections in several chapters that define the
information that must be in the Construction Documents which includes
both the specifications and the drawings.  I have not found any
structural provision that requires something be placed on specifically
on the drawing.
 
Statements to the effect "All design and construction shall comply with
the requirements of the 2007 California Building Code" are problematic.
Are you asking the Contractor to check your design?  Best practice is to
clearly tell the contractor what you expect him to do.
 
In California the Contractors State License Board takes the position
that if there is a licensed engineer or architect  on the project, in
the absence of a design build requirement, then the contractor is only
responsible for complying with the Contract Documents.  If there is no
engineer or architect preparing documents then the contractor is
responsible for complying with the building code.
 
Mark Gilligan

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