Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: what's wrong?

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
I guess it depends on what the definition of a soil report is. In South
Australia all houses require a soil report. But all it comprises of is
drilling 3 soil cores, identifying the strata and assigning a plasticity
index. For additions only one soil core is required, if a report exists for
the existing house and the house is in good condition then the previous
report can be used without further cores being taken.

The main point of the exercise is to determine the soil heave for reactive
soils, and otherwise check for presence of rock, or see if site has been cut
and filled and what with. The "report" is simply a handwritten (scribbled)
bore log. The fee around $100 to $150 (AUS): the major component of cost is
usually travel distance and that may push it up to $300. The soil cores are
typically logged by technicians. Civil engineers then use the information to
design the footing. Though if the site is not too reactive, then slab and
footing sizes can be taken direct from the national residential slab and
footing code. If the drilling companies would classify the site, then
building designers could size up slabs and footings: which I believe they do
interstate.

These reports are thus not substantial geotechnical reports by geotechnical
engineers. The reports do however provide some useful information about the
site allowing design decisions to be made. On the other hand we would
probably be hard pressed to get a geotechnical report from a geotechnical
engineer.

Regards
Conrad Harrison
B.Tech (mfg & mech), MIIE, gradTIEAust
mailto:sch.tectonic(--nospam--at)bigpond.com
Adelaide
South Australia

-----Original Message-----
From: sscholl2(--nospam--at)juno.com [mailto:sscholl2(--nospam--at)juno.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, 16 January 2008 15:21
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: what's wrong?

In addition to the previouus reasons for not doing a geotechnical/soils
report  for small residential additions, I believe another reason for not
doing such a report is that almost certainly the recommendations of such a
report will require a much more rigid foundation and thus parts of the
building will move more than the newer addition and thus damages will occur
at the join lines.

Stan Scholl, P.E.
Laguna Beach, CA
_____________________________________________________________
Click here for comprehensive information on stopping unwanted email.
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2111/fc/Ioyw6iieeS2aPvHL4cgvaIHeFNQpyD6s
CoTmpx3uzmgNflm6mTfH03/



******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ******** 



******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********