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RE: Hand-held Calculator Recommended

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I think this explains why the scientific calculator companies are
getting out of the business. Dedicated hardware calculators cannot
compete with software calculators on small handheld computers.
Especially when you can buy a small PDA or laptop for less than a
scientific calculator.

Christopher Banbury, PE
President

Ark Engineering, Inc.
PO Box 10129, Brooksville, FL 34603
22 North Broad ST, Brooksville, FL 34601
Phone: (352) 754-2424
Fax: (352) 754-2412
www.arkengineering.net


-----Original Message-----
From: Conrad Harrison [mailto:sch.tectonic(--nospam--at)bigpond.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 10:31 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Hand-held Calculator Recommended


Another alternative is a software calculator operating on a handheld
computer (PDA).

http://www.calculator.org/

Calc98 is free. And can be configured to operate in RPN or algebraic
logic.
I've only used it on a desk top in place of the windows calculator, and
then
only when MS Excel isn't already open. I have an Excel workbook I use as
a
scratch pad for miscellaneous calculations.

For those spur of the moment decision making, off the top of my head
calculations I prefer my HP28S: which currently has the batteries held
in
place with tape. My father is still using an HP32E, though with built up
battery packs from a specialist battery supplier.  Most of the text is
worn
from the keyboard though not the keys.

I guess once we get familiar with a calculator we try to keep it working
for
as long as possible.

I like the software/touch-screen option because it permits having a
calculator keyboard rather than the QWERTY keyboard of pocket computers
and
programmable calculators. If all else fails, program my own. On the
other
hand it is possible to use Excel on handhelds.

So I guess it boils down to what function does a calculator provide,
which
is not available with a laptop computer or handheld computer?

Battery life may be an important issue. If need to be able to do
comprehensive calculations in a remote location, then a handheld
computer
programmed for the specific purpose is probably the best option if have
access to power for recharging the batteries. If really remote and
isolated,
then a LCD calculator using AA batteries which can last 3 or more years
would be the best option.

Regards
Conrad Harrison
B.Tech (mfg & mech), MIIE, gradTIEAust
mailto:sch.tectonic(--nospam--at)bigpond.com
Adelaide
South Australia
 



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