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RE: Place of Public Assembly

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Gerard,
Try looking at the front sheet of architectural drawings, or site plan or some other plans titled 'egress' plan or 'exiting' plan, or something like this. You may be able to find the occupant load for the building calculated by the architect.
 
The word 'public' could mean anything other than those related to single or multi-family residential, and also common use areas within residential; and any building or portion of it with an occupant load grater than 50 may falls under Occupancy Group A (Assembly). Occupancy classification is provided in CBC Chapter 3 in Volume 1.
 
So, the key is determining whether the area is a public area, and if it falls under Occupancy Group A (occupancy load of >= 50).
 
HTH.
Suresh Acharya, S.E.
 


From: Gerard Madden, SE [mailto:gmse4603(--nospam--at)gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 10:43 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Place of Public Assembly

Hi,

Anyone know where I can find the code definition of "PLACES OF PUBLIC ASSEMBLY" ?

Table 1604.5 of the 2007 CBC has Occupancy Category III for the following:

"Covered structures whose primary occupancy is public assembly with an occupant load greater than 300"

This clause previously only appeared in the Chapter A (Oshpd and DSA) sections of the code. It triggers an importance factor of 1.5 for Occupancy Category III buildings in the 2007 CBC (in the 2001 CBC, this meant only 1.15 importance factor).

My structure is a 1 story swimming pool building. No viewing bleachers, but the dimensions of the room and size of the pool mean it can physically hold more than 300 people.

To me, it's not a place where public assembly is the purpose of the building such as an auditorium, lobby, or other area where people come for the purpose of witnessing something.

any thoughts?
-gm