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Re: Wood Difference

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In an engineering sense here in the states, a timber is any member with the smaller side equal to or greater than 5" (nominal); lumber is anything smaller. I.e. 2x12s are lumber; 4x6s are lumber, 6x6s are timber, as are 6x12s and 16x28s. Nominal sizes for lumber are 1/2" less for widths up to 6", and 3/4" less than nominal for widths above 6". Timber sizes are all 1/2" less than nominal.

More specifically, the timber engineering values are noticeably lower for a given species and grade than their lumber equivalents.  I believe that timbers are also graded as cut lengths. A 10 foot long 2x6 No.2 may be cut to any length and still be a No. 2 grade, but a 14' long 8x14 No. 2 timber which cut to 8' long must be re-graded.  Buddy or Scott may chime in here and tell me if I'm correct or not, as I don't have a reference other than the odd conversation with forgotten sources.

Clear as mud.
Jordan


Rhkratzse(--nospam--at)aol.com wrote:
Dam little.  Wood is a very general term for the "meat" of a tree, down to toothpicks or chopsticks.  Lumber is after it's been sawn into pieces and generally means pieces used for building (as opposed to eating or picking one's teeth).  Timber is a term generally used to describe larger pieces of lumber, but may vary and isn't very specific.

HTH,

Ralph

In a message dated 6/26/08 10:11:28 AM, jjtreff(--nospam--at)hotmail.com writes:
For most of you this might be a very basic question, but for someone coming from a country where only masonry and concrete exist, it's confusing.

Structurally speaking, what's the difference between wood, lumber and timber?

Thank you!



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