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RE: 12" frame walls

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Be careful with 12" SIPs for walls.  Most SIP manufacturer's only have load span tables for wall use for 4 in walls upto typically 8 in walls as those are what are commonly used.  12" and 10" are generally usually considered "roof panels"...but they can be used for walls...you just might not get anything to that effect in a code evaluation report.
 
Regards,
 
Scott
Adrian, MI
-----Original Message-----
From: Andrew Kester, P.E. [mailto:akester(--nospam--at)cfl.rr.com]
Sent: Wednesday, October 08, 2008 1:28 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: re: 12" frame walls

YI YANG:

You may want to research using structural insulated panels (SIP) if you want a thick, high R value, structural wall system. They come in lengths of up to 24ft with some decent lateral load (PSF) ratings depending on the span and wall thickness.

 

Scott Maxwell (on this list) knows a whole lot more than I do about these, but I have been the engineer on a couple projects where we used them for walls, roofs and floors. They are quiet, stiff, and they have a high R value.

 

FYI they are basically panels made of high density, high strength foam, with a layer of sheathing on each side.

 

Drawbacks are openings and uplift connections, and these require careful planning by the arch and SE during the CD stage. Do not wait until these are out in the field to have all that figured out. On the plus side of that, the SIP mfrs produce excellent shop dwgs in 3D and you have a second chance to review the intricacies of your design. It is a bit of a new system so plan for the learning curve in your fee.

 

FWIW I have no affiliation with any SIP mfrs…

 

Andrew Kester, PE

ADK Structural Engineering

Orlando, FL