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RE: Roof height for A-Frame

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David,

 

My first thought would be to take the rafter bearing point as the “eave” and determine the mean roof height accordingly. That would give you a more conservative answer.

 

My second thought is that it may not matter anyway—the 10psf minimum vertical projected wind load from ASCE 7 probably governs regardless of what you define as the mean roof height.

 

Regards,

Gary

Gary J. Ehrlich, PE
Program Manager, Structural Codes & Standards
National Association of Home Builders (NAHB)
1201 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005
ph: 202-266-8545  or 800-368-5242 x8545
fax: 202-266-8369
gehrlich(--nospam--at)nahb.com

Attend the 2009 International Builders' Show
January 20-23, 2009, Las Vegas, NV
www.BuildersShow.com

 


From: David Topete [mailto:d.topete73(--nospam--at)gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, November 10, 2008 8:55 PM
To: SEAINT
Subject: Roof height for A-Frame

 

Where would the "roof height" be defined for a "single-story" structure with enough volume below the roof (12:12 pitch) that creates a second floor?  The gable ends extend to the roof ridge, while the rafters bear on a pony wall +18" above the second floor.  The second floor is 11'-0" above the ground floor.  Any thoughts would be much appreciated.  TIA.

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David Topete, SE