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RE: Cost Effective Mechanical Lap Splice?

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Field welding is expensive and would probably be the last alternative. Any field welding done here must be accompanied by a special inspector. Gone are the days of half stresses without inspection. That's probably for good reason. The last field weld I saw that wasn't inspected looked really crappy, even by my standards.

:o)

 

 

T. William (Bill) Allen, S.E.

ALLEN DESIGNS

Consulting Structural Engineers
 
V (949) 248-8588 F(949) 209-2509

-----Original Message-----
From: Daryl Richardson [mailto:h.d.richardson(--nospam--at)shaw.ca]
Sent: Friday, December 05, 2008 8:43 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Cost Effective Mechanical Lap Splice?

 

Fellow engineers,

 

        Sorry to be butting into this discussion at such a late date; but why don't you just weld on an extension to the rebar to increase the length of the lap?  Logic (at least to me) suggests that the force in the bars will be decreasing from the pour break to the end of the bar, therefore, the weld will be in a location of low force; and, therefore, even a poor quality weld (or slightly heat deteriorated rebar as a result of the weld) should be more than adequate.

 

        Just a thought.

 

Regards,

 

H. Daryl Richardson

----- Original Message -----

From: Bill Allen

Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2008 7:24 PM

Subject: RE: Cost Effective Mechanical Lap Splice?

 

If the contractor uses 7,000 psi concrete to get the required lap length short enough, can he go back to 5,000 psi concrete beyond the lap splice?

I can't see any reason why not, but I could be missing something.

 

TIA,

 

 

T. William (Bill) Allen, S.E.

ALLEN DESIGNS

Consulting Structural Engineers
 
V (949) 248-8588 F(949) 209-2509