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RE: Wind design on hillside and slopes - tools

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I'll check out Delorme, I have two of their printed atlas gazetteers, great
for logging and 4WD roads, but not enough detail for topo (1:150,000). My
project is way out in the sticks, it's off the grid and the property doesn't
have an address (so I am told), just an APN.

-----Original Message-----
From: Scott Maxwell [mailto:smaxwell(--nospam--at)umich.edu] 
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2009 6:37 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Wind design on hillside and slopes - tools

You can get a good set of electronic topo maps from DeLorme.  It only costs
$100 for the whole US.  That is what I have used when have done the topo
factor on some projects.  It will let you located site (most of time) by
street address...or you can always use lat and long.

Regards,

Scott
Adrian, MI

...... Original Message .......
On Tue, 6 Jan 2009 16:04:19 -0800 "Jeff Smith" <jeffsmith7(--nospam--at)comcast.net>
wrote:
>
>I use a trail GPS for recreation , I wish I had remembered to take it 
>with
me to the site I mentioned in my wind topo post. Since I do not have good
topo info, I started looking at google earth. You can get elevations by
moving your mouse over the image and you can measure distances with the
ruler tool. Unfortunatley there is not an topo layer in Google Earth, but
there is a topo terrain view in Google Maps, so you can go back and forth
between the two.  I found that you can download and open a USGS topo map
overlay .kmz file and it will place the map over your point of interest in
Google Earth and you can print out the map at decent resolution. I found it
to be kind of buggy and sometimes does not load or loads after a long delay.
I found the file on a blog and I am not sure if it is legal to distribute so
I have not posted the link.
> 
>Jeff
>---------------
>From: Dennis Wish [mailto:dennis.wish(--nospam--at)verizon.net]
>Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2009 12:47 PM
>To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
>Subject: Wind design on hillside and slopes - tools
>
>
>I received a Garmin Nuvis 205W GPS for my car from family. The prices 
>are
dropping and it was purchased for $100.00 locally and is normally over
$200.00. I discovered that it is not only accurate for pedestrian use to
find a cache from a game posted on the Garmin website where coordinates are
provided to help you locate a point of interest cache, but that the device
also maintained a proper elevation measurement while driving up into the
mountains. In the current wind force analysis of ASCE 7-05, a hillside
structure needs to be analyzed for wind traveling up the slope. The bottom
and top  elevation of the hill needs to be

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