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Re: crane overturn video

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On Jul 13, 2009, at 4:49 PM, Andrew Kester wrote:

I thought most modern cranes had computers and warning systems that let you know if you are anywhere near an unsafe load. That is per Discovery Channel or TLC, not experience.
Every crane I've ever had anything to do with has an inclinometer to determine the boom angle and a chart of the allowable load for the boom angle and extension. Any big lift generally is planned a bit beforehand so there's an idea of how close the load limit is being approached. And there's always a lift supervisor who directs the operator with hand signals or a two-way radio. The operator is usually too busy running the machine to look out for obstacles and estimate the path of the load,

I couldn't make out much from the video, but I was surprised at how many people seemed to be around. Usually you want bystanders kept clear.

Christopher Wright P.E. |"They couldn't hit an elephant at
chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com   | this distance" (last words of Gen.
.......................................| John Sedgwick, Spotsylvania 1864)
http://www.skypoint.com/members/chrisw/



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