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Re: snow exposure factor - Ce

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Different roof elevations can have different basic (balanced) snow loads.

Regards
Paul
-- 
Paul Ransom, P.Eng.
ph 905 639-9628
fax 905 639-3866
ad026(--nospam--at)hwcn.org


> From: D E <struktur.dle(--nospam--at)gmail.com>

> I have a building with a high roof over a clear story adjacent to a lower
> roof. The high roof is considered fully exposed. My question is how should
> the low roof balanced snow be calculated, is it considered partially
> exposed? With the high roof portion considered a higher structure as
> mentioned in footnote a of Table 7-2. So the high roof has a lower balanced
> snow load than the low roof. I know the low roof will also have drift
> loading and sliding snow loads.
> 
> It seems like the structure should have just one exposure factor.


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