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Re: Retaining Wall Seismic Loads

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Maybe, this is due to the fact that the seismic soil pressures are so - to say the least - over-conservative? 
 
Does anybody on this List have a first-hand experience with the earthquake-induced sliding or overturning damage to a "regular" retaining wall (up to 12 feet tall, and not on a path of a larger landslide)?
 
Thanks,
 
V. Steve Gordin, SE
Irvine CA
    
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2009 06:52
Subject: RE: Retaining Wall Seismic Loads

We too follow our Geotech who frequently makes recommendations for revised safety factors as noted in this post. 

 

How can Geotechs "deviate" from The Code like this?

 


From: erik_g(--nospam--at)cox.net [mailto:erik_g(--nospam--at)cox.net]
Sent: Monday, July 20, 2009 8:54 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Retaining Wall Seismic Loads

 

In the past when I added the seismic load to a basement retaining wall, the resulting footing was very large. I talked to the geo-eng and he said that I can use a F.S. of 1.1 for sliding & overturning, since the load is very short duration. If you do this the footing sizes are not so big. Just a thought. 

 

 

 

 

 

 -----Original Message-----
From: Salvador Dorado [mailto:sdorado(--nospam--at)tbengineeringinc.com]
Sent: Monday, July 20, 2009 2:51 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Retaining Wall Seismic Loads

Very helpful information.  Thank you.