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RE: bar spacing

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If it is that small, then the GC ought to be able to get away with just a prescriptive design without the involvement of an engineer… right?

 


From: Jeff Hedman [mailto:jeff_h(--nospam--at)lrpope.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 03, 2009 11:36 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: re: bar spacing

 

Andrew and Bill,

I agree with what you are saying.  I don’t like to exceed the 18” spacing either.  However, the only reason I bring all this up is for the fact that this is such a small addition (864 sq. ft.) so the loads are really pretty low.  My numbers show the walls could work with #4 bars @ 24” o.c. each way other than it doesn’t meet the maximum spacing requirements.  Looking at IRC Table R611.3(2) it says for an 8’-0” tall 5.5” core ICF wall with 30 psf wind pressure I can use #4 bars @ 48” o.c. each way.   Now don’t get me wrong I would NEVER be willing to stamp anything with bars spaced that far apart.  But if calculation shows that bars @ 24” o.c. each way work and the IRC table says I can go to 48” o.c., are we really getting the client anything better with 18” o.c. spacing?  If this was a commercial building or even a large house, it would be 18” o.c. spacing period.  But with such a small residential addition, it sometimes makes you wonder, especially when calculations show that it will work spaced out more than 18”.  As far as the beer goes, I definitely agree, never light beer, and always bottles.  I usually have the beers with the “watered-down lagerish taste”, but being in Utah, I always have some good Utah microbrews on hand.  (Yes, they sell beer here).  Polygamy Porter or Cutthroat Pale Ale are a couple of good ones.

 

Thanks for all the input.

 

Jeff Hedman, SE