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Re: AISC Specification

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Gary,

As to the Code of Standard Practice, you could just email him the entire PDF
of the current version:
http://www.aisc.org/WorkArea/showcontent.aspx?id=6878

As to the "national standard", as noted by others, it is nominally the AISC
"Design Specification".  I use that generic term because which version of
that "document" will vary by location (more on that below).  As noted by
others, we do not technically have any "national
codes/specifications/material standards" that are required nationwide.  We
have such codes and standards that are developed and then can be adopted by
local jurisdictions (whether statewide in some states or at the city/county
level for other states or even nothing in some places).  Generally speaking,
most jurisdictions will now adopt a version of the IBC code, which then will
reference a version of the AISC "Design Specification".  Thus, the end
result is that the AISC "Design Specification" could be considered the "de
facto" "national standard".  At a minimum, as noted by someone else, it
would certainly be considered the "standard of care".

Now, the AISC "Design Specification" is going to be a version of AISC's
"Specification for Structural Steel Buildings".  The current version is AISC
360-05.  You will have an older version in your AISC 9th edition steel
manual (aka the Green ASD Book), which might actually still be "in effect"
in some jurisdictions in the US.  The one in the Green ASD book was the last
one to deal with ASD design until 360-05 came out.  There are several other
old versions that deal with LRFD.

I will note that the IBC does NOT directly reference the AISC "Code of
Standard Practice" (aka AISC 303-05).  Rather it references AISC 360-05 and
AISC 360-05 then references the AISC 303-05.  In particular, Section A4 of
AISC 360-05 says:

"Structural Design Drawings and Specifications

The design drawings and specifications shall meet the requirements of the
'Code of Standard Practice for Steel Buildings and Bridges', except for
deviations specifically identified in the design drawings and/or
specifications."

It is this section in AISC 360-05 that basically requires the Design
Documents to follow section of the AISC "Code of Standard Practice" (unless
someone wants to invoke the exception).

HTH,

Regards,

Scott
Adrian, MI

On 9/21/09 8:07 AM, "Gary L. Hodgson and Assoc." <design(--nospam--at)hodgsoneng.ca>
wrote:

> Bill and Christopher,
> Thanks for the replies.  I should have given a  more detailed
> explanation of why I asked.  I got into a little cat-fight with a
> consulting engineering firm over fabricator's shop drawings which were
> to be sealed by a P. Eng.  The contract drawings showed connections with
> very little detail, i.e plate sizes, but no weld sizes, shear forces but
> no axial forces, eccentric loads on connections.  I wrote to this firm
> and requested the member forces which are required by our national
> specification CSA S16.1 "Limit States Design of Steel Structures".  A
> person wrote back in an unsigned letter that I was to just follow the
> contract drawings and seal the shop drawings. I replied that under no
> circumstances would I seal the drawings with the information supplied
> and explained why, and I also asked if he or she was a structural
> engineer since I suspected I was dealing with a "civilian".  He took
> great offence at that and accused me of unethical behaviour.  I wrote
> back and suggested he look in a mirror. I am still awaiting the forces
> acting on members.
> 
> As a side-light to this, I contacted the Professional Engineers of
> Ontario (PEO) and asked the guy in charge of "standards and practises"
> what happened to a planned committee on the long on-going dispute
> between fabricators and consulting engineers over shop drawings. We
> discussed the issue in general and he asked me what the USA uses for a
> steel specification.  I should really have referred him to your code of
> standard practise which covers this issue of shop drawings better than
> anything up here.  I copied the relevant piece from the AISC 9th edition
> and e-mailed it to him.
> Gary
> 
> Christopher Wright wrote:
>> 
>> On Sep 19, 2009, at 7:27 AM, Gary L. Hodgson and Assoc. wrote:
>> 
>>> I have been asked what is the national standard for steel design and
>>> construction in the United States.  My reply was that the AISC spec
>>> is the de facto standard.  But is this true or is there a national
>>> standard of which I am unaware.  I have seen large engineering
>>> companies in the US put out their own specifications but they also
>>> invariably quote some part of the AISC spec.
>> 
>> Better to say that the AISC Code represents the standard of care for
>> steel design--by itself it doesn't have the force of law.  The
>> standards which do carry legal standing are the local building codes.
>> The codes incorporate the AISC Code by reference and possibly include
>> modifications or additional requirements based on local requirements,
>> since the AISC Code doesn't cover everything. You might face criminal
>> penalties for violating the building code but not for violating the
>> steel code which would be a matter of professional negligence--a civil
>> matter.
>> 
>> The AISC Code may also be incorporated in other requirements, like the
>> ASME Nuclear Code and other federal standards or it may be a
>> contractual requirement as well.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Christopher Wright P.E. |"They couldn't hit an elephant at
>> chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com   | this distance" (last words of Gen.
>> .......................................| John Sedgwick, Spotsylvania
>> 1864)
>> http://www.skypoint.com/members/chrisw/
>> 
>> 
>> 
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