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RE: Contracting through Architect

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The dearth is because most archys are terrible about money.

 

They are afraid to ask the owners for it…and when they get it, they

Keep it.

 

 

I have a client that did exactly that…he got paid by the owner

(who was a friend of mine) and I knew he got paid.

 

I confronted the architect about and called me “unprofessional”

 

 

David L. Fisher SE PE

Senior Principal

 

Fisher and Partners

372 West Ontario

Suite 301

Chicago 60654

 

312.622.0409 (m)

312.573.1701

312.573.1726 (f)

 

www.fpse.com

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Rhkratzse(--nospam--at)aol.com [mailto:Rhkratzse(--nospam--at)aol.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 1:59 PM
To: mblangy(--nospam--at)satco-inc.com; seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Contracting through Architect

 

I would also be somewhat leery, or at least *careful*, when contracting with an owner through a "representative."  Depending on how large a project is, and whether it justifies the overhead of an attorney-reviewed specific contract (most of mine don't), and who the rep is -- licensed, unlicensed, or just the client's brother who happens to be out of work at the moment -- such an arrangement *might* be acceptable.

BTW there appears to be a dearth of "pro" comments about contracting with an architect.   ;)

Ralph

In a message dated 11/5/09 11:40:53 AM, mblangy(--nospam--at)satco-inc.com writes:

From PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS ACT (Business and Professions Code §§ 6700 – 6799)
 
"The written contract shall be executed by the professional engineer and the client, or his or her representative, prior to the professional engineer commencing work,.."
 
What would constitute a "representative?"
 
> As far as I know, at least in California, a professional engineer may not have a contract with an unlicensed. You must have a written agreement with the owner.