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Re: Career Day Presentation

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Christopher,

I didn't mean to imply that the course helped me to plan my career but rather that it helped me to avoid making a bad career change. Each person has strong (and moderate) likes and dislikes that often have not been fully explored. It's useful to explore some of these before you make serious choices (like spouse or career) that are difficult to correct later. After all, what little boy didn't once want to be a policeman, or a fireman, or a cowboy because of certain exciting things he saw on TV?

Regards,

H. Daryl Richardson

----- Original Message ----- From: "Christopher Wright" <chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2010 8:00 PM
Subject: Re: Career Day Presentation



On Jan 27, 2010, at 12:16 PM, Daryl Richardson wrote:

most helpful was a course called " Career Life Planning" This course presented methods of self analysis and the prioritization of one's wants and needs. On completing this course I came to realize that, as an engineer, I already was in the best and most rewarding career for me. One of the references used in that course was a book called "What Color is Your Parachute?" Your wife might find this book useful if she is in the business of helping students make career choices.

My experience is that career life planning is an oxymoron. Any career path that you could possibly plan out would be so confining you'd probably end up riding the rails or drinking yourself to death. I doubt that 1 in 10 college (let alone high-school) graduates have the self-knowledge or the understanding of technological change to plan out a career path, not to mention foresee the all the dips and peaks of an 21st century life. I think you could make a good statistical argument for that from the engineering turnover rate alone. Maybe you could have done that 150 years ago before technological change became so fast, but not these days. It'd be interesting to see how many of the list subscribers think they could have possibly foreseen all they've experienced in the last 30 years

I don't think think that's a negative aspect of engineering. Explaining that to the engineering wannabes could be a very positive thing.

Christopher Wright P.E. |"They couldn't hit an elephant at
chrisw(--nospam--at)skypoint.com   | this distance" (last words of Gen.
.......................................| John Sedgwick, Spotsylvania 1864)
http://www.skypoint.com/members/chrisw/




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