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Re: seaint Digest for 16 Apr 2010

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My thanks go to all who answered to Shiraz's thread. I love these
descriptions of terms shaped into human words that you won't find in
any source.

On 17 April 2010 21:20, Kembcon <engineers(--nospam--at)kembcon.com> wrote:
> Mr. Shahid:
>
> In a sense, any steel building is pre-engineered, since it is rare to have
> the steel all fabricated in the field instead of being designed, detailed
> and then fabricated in a shop.  However, the term is more specifically used
> for buildings that are provided in a "kit", along with engineering by the
> manufacturer of the kit.
> There is usually additional engineering required for a project with a
> pre-engineered building.  The manufacturer's engineer designs the building
> and takes responsibility for it, but the architect or engineer of record for
> the project does the site design, interiors, electrical, mechanical and
> plumbing design, and usually the foundations.
>
> Most pre-engineered buildings have welded three plate moment frames
> supporting cold formed purlins in the roof and girts in the walls.  The
> building skin is commonly pre-finished corrugated steel, although just about
> any material can be used over the basic structural system.  Lateral loads at
> right angles to the frames are commonly resisted by rod bracing in the plane
> of the roof and rod or portal braces or frames in the plane of the walls.
>
> There are also pre-engineered masonry, fiberglass, aluminum and concrete
> buildings, but they tend to be smaller.  Pre-engineered steel buildings can
> be quite large, although generally only single story, perhaps with a
> mezzanine.
> The big three of pre-engineered steel buildings in the US are American,
> Butler and Varco-Pruden.  They all have good websites.  I have built all of
> these over the years and they are all good systems.  There are many good
> regional manufacturers and other smaller national firms.  The more
> substantial ones are members of the MBMA, which is like the AISC, only  for
> metal building firms.  The AISC used to have a certification process for
> pre-engineered buildings, but they dropped it, (although many engineers
> continue to specify it).
>
> The rationale for using a pre-engineered steel building instead of a
> conventional hot-rolled or tube steel structure is usually cost and
> sometimes schedule.  Right now, you can get a pre-engineered building of
> just about any size in somewhere between four and ten weeks, including
> engineering for the structure.  Pre-engineered buildings usually cost more
> per pound of steel than a hot-rolled or tube steel building but use less
> steel by using tapered beams and columns and light gauge secondaries.
>
> Pre-manufactured buildings are usually factory built in modules and trucked
> to the site, set with a crane or lift, and bolted together.  The size of the
> modules is limited by the "over the rad" clearance requirements, which is
> usually about 10 feet wide x 60 feet long x 16 feet high, including the
> lowboy trailer.  Pre-manufactured buildings are often used for temporary
> facilities and in this case are often not installed on permanent
> foundations.  Modular buildings can be assembled into quite large structures
> by combining modules.  Many jurisdictions have a separate building code for
> manufactured housing which is less restrictive than the code for site built
> structures.
>
> Hope that helps.  As you can tell, I am a fan of pre-engineered steel
> buildings. / Eric Cox, RSE
>
>
> From: "Shiraz Shahid" <sshahid(--nospam--at)engineering-solutions.biz>
>>
>> To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
>> Subject: Preengineered - Prefabricated
>>
>> This is a multipart message in MIME format.
>>
>> ------=_NextPart_000_0003_01CADD71.47653B20
>> Content-Type: text/plain;
>>        charset="us-ascii"
>> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>>
>> Hi
>>
>> Please if the list can tell me the difference between pre-engineered and
>> pre-fabricated buildings. Or are they one and the same thing?
>>
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>> Shiraz Shahid.
>>
>
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-- 
Alexander Bausk
Civil/Structural design & inspection engineer, CAD professional
http://bausk.wordpress.com
ONILAES Lab at PSACEA
Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine
Tel. +38 068 4079692
Fax. +38 0562 470263
bauskas(--nospam--at)gmail.com

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