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Re: Brick ties

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From Building Construction by Huntington, 12th Printing February 1951 used in my 1st quarter freshman class at Cal Poly:

 

Page 332.  “Frame Walls Veneered with Brick or Other Masonry”

 

1.         What not to do:  Nailed corrugated brick galvanized tie with nail some distance above the course of the brick and slightly looped down from the nail to the top of the course.  Caution is tie straightening out and allowing the wall to move away from the building.

 

2.         What to do:      8d common galvanized nail driven through brick tied and through the sheathing into a stud with an air space between the sheathing and the stud.  The nail is the same height as the top of the particular brick course.  After the course is laid, the tie is bent sharply over the nail head (with the vertical leg below the top of the course) so that it is in the plane of the grout between courses.

 

(above is clumsy description of Fig. 107)

 

Prior to this method, 40d common galvanized nails driven 1.50” into the stud were used.  They were installed at about the height of the particular course being laid. (shown in Fig. 106 (j) on page 331.

 

If you look at Sleeper’s Graphic Standards 5th edition (1956) and 8th printing 1965, (page 142), it shows the “common defect in usual method” from Huntington’s Book.   Sleeper says every 5th course.

 

Ribbed probably equals corrugated.


Neil Moore



On 10/21/2010 2:05 PM, h.d.richardson wrote:
Gordon,

       Don't remember "50 to 60" specifically; but I had "an almost"project more like 90 years old.  The "brick ties" were 3.5" or 4" long nails driven into the wall studs.  Over the 90 or so Canadian winters the differential temperature movements has worked many of the nails loose.  As a result of this the brick veneer was very "wavy and in imminent danger of complete structural failure.  The building was sold "as is" and the new owner removed and reinstalled (using the same brick) the exterior brick veneer.

       Based on the above, I expect almost anything is possible.  You may have to do some selective demolition to find out what was actually used on your project.

       Good luck.

Regards,

H. Daryl Richardson

----- Original Message ----- From: "Gordon Goodell" <GordonGoodell(--nospam--at)harmonydesigninc.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2010 12:17 PM
Subject: Brick ties


Does anyone know how brick facades were typically anchored 50-60 years
ago? Ribbed brick ties back then?

thanks,
Gordon Goodell

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