Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: Modulus of Subgrade Reaction

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
It is a large, pile supported concrete thrust block to resist the forces in an above ground pipe due to thermal expansion and contraction among other loads. In the case of the ones I'm working with they include dead load, water load, the thrust of horizontal bends in the pipe, friction loads caused by the packing at expansion joints, seismic loads and, in one case, traffic loads of a county road passing up and over the pipeline at the anchor. The anchors are located about 2500 feet apart on a 65" Ø riveted steel pipleline constructed in the late 1920s.

Bill Cain, S.E.
Berkeley, CA





From: vicpeng(--nospam--at)telus.net
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Modulus of Subgrade Reaction
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2010 12:28:51 -0800

What’s a “temperature anchor”?

 

From: Bill Cain [mailto:bcainse(--nospam--at)live.com]
Sent: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 12:17 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Modulus of Subgrade Reaction

 

Thor-

Don't forget the impact of oxidation of the peat type soils. I'm working on a project in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta where temperature anchors for a major water supply aqueduct show oxidation of the peat of 11-15 feet (yes, feet) over the past 82 years. This has resulted in the exposure and rotting of the tops of timber piles supporting the temperature anchors.

 

Peat is a weird material and normal soil behavior doesn't seem to apply.  I hope you are not planning on long term support by the peat. Oxidation could cause huge "settlements".

Bill Cain, S.E.
Berkeley, CA




> From: vicpeng(--nospam--at)telus.net
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: Modulus of Subgrade Reaction
> Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2010 16:06:59 -0800
>
> I have a value of 75 lb/in^3 ... but on one site, for LL>50 and MC>28%, I
> found values for (very) weak clays of 25 lb/in^3 ... but clay is not peat
> ...
>
> I'm doing a model of an elastic beam on soil using an old version "pframe"
> because it is idiot-proof and (yes, I'm an idiot) I need to check the
> Winkler spring value that I'm using ... the lower the value the higher the
> bending moments in the beam ...
>
> Thor A. Tandy P.Eng, C.Eng, Struct.Eng, MIStructE, MSCSE
> Victoria, BC
> Canada
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Joe Venuti [mailto:jovenengr(--nospam--at)verizon.net]
> Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2010 3:47 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: Modulus of Subgrade Reaction
>
> Quite low and maybe sinking
>
> Joe Venuti, P.E.
> Joven Engineering
> La Quinta, CA
> jovenengr(--nospam--at)verizon.net
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Thor Tandy [mailto:vicpeng(--nospam--at)telus.net]
> Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2010 1:21 PM
> To: SEAInt
> Subject: Modulus of Subgrade Reaction
>
> Does anyone have an estimate for the MOSR for peat or peat-like soils?
>
> Thanks
>
> Thor A. Tandy P.Eng, C.Eng, Struct.Eng, MIStructE, MSCSE
> Victoria, BC
> Canada
>
>
>
> ******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
> * Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
> *
> * This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
> * Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
> * subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
> *
> * http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
> *
> * Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
> * send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
> * without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
> * site at: http://www.seaint.org
> ******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********