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RE: seaint Digest for 25 Feb 2011

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David,

Your rhetorical question is at the heart of my post.  It doesn't make since
to apply either the point of load application of Case B or the wind loads of
Case C to a fence.  Not only is the point of load application not logical
but the forces are astronomical.  I am serious when I say I am getting a 4ft
to 6ft for a 6ft fence (depending on the soils conditions).
 
But other than my logic defense, I have no clear code justification for not
applying it.  Hence my post.  I am hoping one of you wonderful code gurus
can point me in the direction of some documentation to assist me.

Respectfully,

Charles R. Ashley Jr., S.E.
Principal Engineer
(805) 545-0010 x111
(323) 744-0010 x111
www.ashleyvance.com


-----Original Message-----
Subject: Re: Wind Loads on Fences
From: David Topete <d.topete73(--nospam--at)gmail.com>
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org


Charles,
If your fence is 78 feet, the total wind force applied at the 20% horizontal
offset would be resisted by the one or two piers/footings closest to the
force application and nothing is resisted by the outer dozen or so footings?

Rhetorical question.
Most municipalities don't require "engineering" for fences up to 6 feet in
height for residences.  Regardless, taking a fairly logical approach would
be to design the footing and fence segments for the 5 foot tributary width.
 Not knowing what you're designing for or what the target clientele for this
fence is makes it difficult to really comment.  But, it seems like a boiler
plate, catch-all footing design you're doing.  Therefore, I'd design for the
highest wind speeds and the crappiest soil conditions.

David Topete, SE



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