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RE: 10 story wood building

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Actually, sustainability was a big reason the UK project was done.  It has a much lower impact on the environment than a comparable concrete building.

 

Robert J. Jonkman, P.Eng.  Manager, Structural Engineering and Sustainable Design

Canadian Wood Council  Suite 400, 99 Bank Street Ottawa, ON  K1P 6B9    |    613-747-5544 ext 252    |      800-463-5091 ext 252      |     Fax: 613-747-6264

rjonkman(--nospam--at)cwc.ca      www.cwc.ca       |     www.woodworks-software.com  |    www.planetfriendlycanada.com 

 

From: erik [mailto:erik_g(--nospam--at)cox.net]
Sent: March-10-11 9:42 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: 10 story wood building

 

This sounds very interesting, but I am curious what the shear capacity of the “tilt up” plywood panels are as well as the seismic code for that part of the UK.

 Also, can you imagine trying to convince some of the very narrow minded people here that this would be a good sustainable building method? Oh oh, not to mention the lawyers that would immediately get involved looking for some new lawsuit.

 

Erik GIbbs

 


From: Showalter, Buddy [mailto:BShowalter(--nospam--at)awc.org] On Behalf Of AWC Info
Sent: Thursday, March 10, 2011 6:11 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: 10 story wood building

 

David,

 

Sounds like a good excuse for a road trip to London to see the 9-story they built there: http://www.nzwood.co.nz/case-studies/murray-grove-tower

 

;)

 

Buddy

 

 

Subject: Re: 10 story wood building

From: David Topete <d.topete73(--nospam--at)gmail.com>

To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org

 

Buddy,

Thanks for the link.  I'll look at it.  Sounds interesting, though I still have my doubts about it...

David

 

On Wed, Mar 9, 2011 at 11:47 AM, AWC Info <Info(--nospam--at)awc.org> wrote:

 

> They don=92t use columns. The structural elements are called cross

> lamina=

ted

> timber. Imagine plywood on steroids. Using 1x or 2x material, they

> lamina=

te

> them together so that each layer is at a right angle to the other. The

> lumber has to be dried to about 10-12% MC prior to laminating so it

> maintains dimensional stability.

> 

> There=92s an article coming out in the next issue of Wood Design Focus

> ab=

out

> it. For those of you who don=92t get that, here=92s a link to a

> document =

on the

> FPInnovations website that addresses design issues:

> 

> http://www.forintek.ca/public/pdf/Special_Pub_Order_Form/SP52CrossLami

> nat=

edTimber_the%20boook.pdf

> 

> HTH

> 

> Buddy