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RE: pt wood and fasteners

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Paul,
Is borate less corrosive than copper sulfate and therefore compatible with electroplated fasteners? 
Yes.  You should always check the IRC. The last time I checked borate treated lumber was acceptable for sill plates. 
 
Does borate treated wood resist deterioration as well as copper sulfate (for a shear wall sill plate, in contact with concrete slab, but not exposed to the elements).
No.  It is not as effective as copper sulfate, but the difference is keeping it dry.  I would allow borate treated sill plates:
1.  If you can be assured that all of your waterproofing elements are robust
2.  You have a positive moisture management system to manage condensation from subgrade, condensation through walls, and from plumbing leaks
3.  The project is in a relatively arid region
 
I guess I have seen too many siding / waterproofing failures to be comfortable.  By the time you know you have a moisture problem, the sill plates are compromised.  Then you have a moisture problem AND structural compromise.  I have seen moisture ingress problems after only 5 years of service from small plumbing leaks, through walls from poor flashing, and from condensation from below grade. 
 
Regards, Harold Sprague


 

From: PFFEI(--nospam--at)aol.com
Date: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 14:33:47 -0400
Subject: pt wood and fasteners
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org

I typically spec hot dip galvanized for all fasteners in pt wood, per building department requirements.
 
I am working with a framer who said he has used electroplated anchor rods with borate treated wood which is much less corrosive than copper sulfate rated. He indicated electroplated 1/2 the cost of hot dip galvanized.
 
Is borate less corrosive than copper sulfate and therefore compatible with electroplated fastness?  Does borate treated wood resist deterioration as well as copper sulfate (for a shear wall sill plate, in contact with concrete slab, but not exposed to the elements).
 
Thank you for your help.
 
Paul Franceschi