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Re: seaint Digest for 13 May 2012

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Harold,
Re: Concrete crack repair.

Now I am convinced that epoxy might be a better way.
But not for everybody.
I represent a small project mentality,
because those were the only ones I happened to manage.
Yes, I know you could probably find such specialized
technicians. But it would take a week to get them to site
and the minimum would be $1000, if not more.
It then becomes tempting to use your own labor force,
because of instant gratification.

SIncerely
Gregory from Oz


----- Original Message ----- From: "admin" <admin(--nospam--at)seausa.org>
To: <ggg(--nospam--at)bigpond.net.au>
Sent: Monday, May 14, 2012 5:00 PM
Subject: seaint Digest for 13 May 2012



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                      seaint Digest for 13 May 2012

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1: Concrete crack repair
by ggg(--nospam--at)bigpond.net.au<BR>To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org<BR>Subject: Concrete crac=



--------------------------------------------------------------------------
1                                Message:0001                            1
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: Harold Sprague <spraguehope(--nospam--at)hotmail.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Subject: RE: Concrete crack repair

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Gregory=2C
=20
The drilling at the ends are good for repairing metals with small cracks th= at are primarily induced from fatigue. The drilling eliminates the stress =
riser and mitigates crack growth propagation.
=20
High grade construction epoxies for concrete repair have excellent bonding =
characteristics and very high strengths in compression=2C peel=2C tension=
=2C and shear. Compression strengths are 15=2C000 psi plus. Epoxy resins = can be used for concrete structural repairs very effectively. For sealing = for water penetration and active cracks=2C it is recommended to use a polyu=
rethane as opposed to an epoxy. =20
=20
Check out ACI RAP Bulletin 1=2C Structural Crack Repair by Epoxy Injection.
http://www.concrete.org/general/RAP-1.pdf
and
The US Bureau of Reclamation Guide to Concrete Repair.
http://www.usbr.gov/pmts/materials_lab/repairs/guide.pdf
=20
The US Bureau of Reclamation Guide is good because it provides guidance on =
when to use epoxy injection and when to use polyurethanes. =20

Regards=2C Harold Sprague
=20



From: ggg(--nospam--at)bigpond.net.au
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Concrete crack repair
Date: Sat=2C 12 May 2012 17:39:24 +1000




Having a modest building experience=2C let me ask this of our learned colle=
agues=2C
especially Harold.
=20
Epoxy=2C I understand=2C is good for sealing=2C but does not have a big str=
ength itself.
Why not=2C instead=2C do the following:
=20
1. Drill thru the ends to prevent further growth.
2. widen the mouth using a small dia grinder
3. Fill with any good putty. They often fuse with parent concrete
and offer almost continuous material.
=20
Sincerely
Gregory from Oz
      =

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<body class=3D'hmmessage'><div dir=3D'ltr'>
Gregory=2C<BR>
&nbsp=3B<BR>
The drilling at the ends are&nbsp=3Bgood for repairing&nbsp=3Bmetals with s= mall cracks that are primarily induced&nbsp=3Bfrom fatigue.&nbsp=3B The dri= lling eliminates the stress riser and mitigates crack growth&nbsp=3Bpropaga=
tion.<BR>
&nbsp=3B<BR>
High grade construction epoxies for concrete repair&nbsp=3Bhave excellent&n= bsp=3Bbonding characteristics and very high strengths in compression=2C pee= l=2C tension=2C and shear.&nbsp=3B Compression strengths are 15=2C000 psi p= lus.&nbsp=3B&nbsp=3BEpoxy resins&nbsp=3Bcan be used for concrete structural= repairs very effectively.&nbsp=3B For sealing for water penetration and ac= tive cracks=2C it is recommended to use a polyurethane as opposed to an epo=
xy.&nbsp=3B <BR>
&nbsp=3B<BR>
Check out <FONT face=3DHelvetica-Condensed-Oblique><FONT face=3DHelvetica-C= ondensed-Oblique><FONT face=3DHelvetica-Condensed-Oblique><FONT face=3DHelv= etica-Condensed-Oblique>ACI</FONT></FONT> RAP Bulletin 1=2C </FONT></FONT><= FONT face=3DHelvetica-Bold><FONT face=3DHelvetica-Bold>Structural Crack Rep=
air by Epoxy Injection.</FONT></FONT><BR>
<A href=3D"http://www.concrete.org/general/RAP-1.pdf";>http://www.concrete.o=
rg/general/RAP-1.pdf</A><BR>
and<BR>
The US Bureau of Reclamation Guide to Concrete Repair.<BR>
<A href=3D"http://www.usbr.gov/pmts/materials_lab/repairs/guide.pdf";>http:/=
/www.usbr.gov/pmts/materials_lab/repairs/guide.pdf</A><BR>
&nbsp=3B<BR>
The US Bureau of Reclamation Guide is good because it provides guidance on = when to&nbsp=3Buse epoxy injection and when to use polyurethanes.&nbsp=3B <=
BR><BR>Regards=2C Harold Sprague<BR>&nbsp=3B<BR>
<DIV>
<DIV id=3DSkyDrivePlaceholder></DIV>
<HR id=3DstopSpelling>
From: ggg(--nospam--at)bigpond.net.au<BR>To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org<BR>Subject: Concrete crac=
k repair<BR>Date: Sat=2C 12 May 2012 17:39:24 +1000<BR><BR>
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<DIV>Having a modest building experience=2C let me ask this of our learned =
colleagues=2C</DIV>
<DIV>especially Harold.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp=3B</DIV>
<DIV>Epoxy=2C I understand=2C is good for sealing=2C but does not have a bi=
g strength itself.</DIV>
<DIV>Why not=2C instead=2C do the following:</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp=3B</DIV>
<DIV>1. Drill thru the ends to prevent further growth.</DIV>
<DIV>2. widen the mouth using a small dia grinder</DIV>
<DIV>3. Fill with any good putty. They often fuse with parent concrete</DIV=

<DIV>and offer almost continuous material.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp=3B</DIV>
<DIV>Sincerely</DIV>
<DIV>Gregory from Oz</DIV>
&nbsp=3B<BR></DIV>      </div></body>
</html>=

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